Instagram Content Strategy 101 (How I Took My Instagram From 0 to 300,000 Followers)

– How I went from zero Instagram followers to 300,000 followers, and I'm not talking about
buying likes or followers or comments or any of
that kind of dodgy stuff, I'm talking about purely organic growth, not ads, literally organic growth. I'll admit that it hasn't
been a smooth ride. There's been a lot of downs, a few ups, but I've learned a lot of valuable lessons that made those ups really high, that got me a ton of followers. And I'll break down the things that have been the most
impactful in my growth. so that way, you don't
have as many downs as me. Based on its global advertising
audience, reach numbers, Instagram has at least 1.393
billion users around the world as of October, 2021. It's grown by 20.3% in
a matter of 12 months, which makes it roughly 235
million new users on Instagram. You may think it's a bit
too late to join the party but it's only getting started.

Every day, I see new accounts growing from zero to hundreds and
thousands of followers. Will you go to a million right away? No, that's unrealistic,
but you can get thousands. And though the competition
is increasing a lot, you can still earn lots of attention if you do the right things. When I was first starting
off at the beginning, I did this experiment. I took content from other
channels like YouTube and Facebook, and I just
posted it on Instagram. I took image-based content
and I posted it there too. I tried lots of different content types until I started finding the right things that worked the best. Now, what I did when I
reached 50,000 followers was a bit different. I started doing partnerships
with influencers. I head up other influencers
in the same niche, not a different niche, same niche, and we went live together, we reposted, and my followers would go to their pages and start following them or their profiles and their followers would go to my profile and start following me.

Here's some of the simple things I did in addition to partnerships. I also, when I started
hitting 50,000 followers, I started doing Twitter screenshots. Put a quote on Twitters, screenshot it, pop that up on Instagram as well. I also did image carousels. Think about an infographic
just broken down into five or six slides so
people can swipe and get data. And you can do that with Canva for free. Now, when I reach 200,000
followers, I started doing things a little bit differently, reels, right? Back then, I don't even
know if reels were out when I first started on Instagram, but I started doing reels
and I started doubling down on doing reels as it was starting to boom. Eventually, some of my
reels worked, some didn't, I quickly learned what topics people love and what they don't. I also doubled down on partnerships. Partnerships were working out. Kept doing more of them but
with bigger influencers. I also started being guests on other people's accounts for lives. See, originally when I
was doing partnerships, I would go live on someone else's profile and then they would go live on my profile.

That's how we cross-promote it. But once I started having
enough of a audience, I would just go live on their profile and not live on my profile
and have them on mine, right? In other words, I would
only be on their account and they wouldn't be on my account. And that brought in a lot of followers and I didn't have to go as
live as often with my audience and give them fatigue.

As found on YouTube

The Marketing Mix and the 4Ps of Marketing


What is marketing? A common definition is: Putting the right product in the right place, at the right price, at the right time. Sounds simple, no? Well, not always. There are so many factors you need to consider when marketing a product or service.

And, if you get just one element wrong, it can be a disaster for your whole campaign. This is where the 4Ps of Marketing are useful. They stand for: “product,” “place,” “price,” and “promotion.” To show you how effective they can be, let’s imagine we want to market a new lamp. The lamp is special because it mimics the warmth and light of the sun.

We’d start by asking key questions about the first P – the product itself. One important thing to ask is, “What do our customers want?” The answer could be that they crave warm, natural light, especially on dark winter days. We could also ask how it differs from competing products. Our lamp is of higher quality, and its light is more like the sun than the others on the market, So let’s look at the next P, which is place.

Where would buyers look for this lamp? Will it be stocked in a store, sold by sales reps, or advertised exclusively online? The next P is price.

Will people think that the lamp is good value? Is our target customer price sensitive?

How will the cost of our lamp compare with the others on the market? The last P is promotion. This is where you’ll define when, where and how you’ll get your message out to your customers. So, what’s the best way to market your innovative sun lamp? One question you need to ask is about timing.

For our product, the best time to market it would probably be in the fall or winter, when everyone is craving light and sunshine. Overall, the four Ps is a useful starting point for building a marketing campaign. The tool helps you define what you want to say to your customers, and how you want to say it. You can find out more about the four Ps, and the questions to ask for each of them, in the article that accompanies this video.

Read More: Testing The Marketing Mix and the 4Ps of Marketing

As found on YouTube

Testing The Marketing Mix and the 4Ps of Marketing


What is marketing? A common definition is: Putting the right product in the right place, at the right price, at the right time. Sounds simple, no? Well, not always. There are so many factors you need to consider when marketing a product or service.

And, if you get just one element wrong, it can be a disaster for your whole campaign. This is where the 4Ps of Marketing are useful. They stand for: “product,” “place,” “price,” and “promotion.” To show you how effective they can be, let’s imagine we want to market a new lamp.

The lamp is special because it mimics the warmth and light of the sun.

We’d start by asking key questions about the first P – the product itself. One important thing to ask is, “What do our customers want?” The answer could be that they crave warm, natural light, especially on dark winter days. We could also ask how it differs from competing products. Our lamp is of higher quality, and its light is more like the sun than the others on the market, So let’s look at the next P, which is place.

Where would buyers look for this lamp? Will it be stocked in a store, sold by sales reps, or advertised exclusively online? The next P is price.

Will people think that the lamp is good value? Is our target customer price sensitive?

How will the cost of our lamp compare with the others on the market? The last P is promotion. This is where you’ll define when, where and how you’ll get your message out to your customers. So, what’s the best way to market your innovative sun lamp? One question you need to ask is about timing.

For our product, the best time to market it would probably be in the fall or winter, when everyone is craving light and sunshine. Overall, the four Ps is a useful starting point for building a marketing campaign.

The tool helps you define what you want to say to your customers, and how you want to say it. You can find out more about the four Ps, and the questions to ask for each of them, in the article that accompanies this video..

Read More: The Marketing Mix and the 4Ps of Marketing

As found on YouTube

The Marketing Mix and the 4Ps of Marketing


What is marketing? A common definition is: Putting the right product in the right place, at the right price, at the right time. Sounds simple, no? Well, not always. There are so many factors you need to consider when marketing a product or service.

And, if you get just one element wrong, it can be a disaster for your whole campaign. This is where the 4Ps of Marketing are useful. They stand for: “product,” “place,” “price,” and “promotion.” To show you how effective they can be, let’s imagine we want to market a new lamp.

The lamp is special because it mimics the warmth and light of the sun.

We’d start by asking key questions about the first P – the product itself. One important thing to ask is, “What do our customers want?” The answer could be that they crave warm, natural light, especially on dark winter days. We could also ask how it differs from competing products. Our lamp is of higher quality, and its light is more like the sun than the others on the market, So let’s look at the next P, which is place.

Where would buyers look for this lamp? Will it be stocked in a store, sold by sales reps, or advertised exclusively online? The next P is price. Will people think that the lamp is good value? Is our target customer price sensitive?

How will the cost of our lamp compare with the others on the market? The last P is promotion.

This is where you’ll define when, where and how you’ll get your message out to your customers. So, what’s the best way to market your innovative sun lamp? One question you need to ask is about timing.

For our product, the best time to market it would probably be in the fall or winter, when everyone is craving light and sunshine. Overall, the four Ps is a useful starting point for building a marketing campaign. The tool helps you define what you want to say to your customers, and how you want to say it. You can find out more about the four Ps, and the questions to ask for each of them, in the article that accompanies this video..

Read More: The Marketing Mix and the 4Ps of Marketing

As found on YouTube

The Marketing Mix and the 4Ps of Marketing


What is marketing? A common definition is: Putting the right product in the right place, at the right price, at the right time. Sounds simple, no? Well, not always. There are so many factors you need to consider when marketing a product or service.

And, if you get just one element wrong, it can be a disaster for your whole campaign. This is where the 4Ps of Marketing are useful. They stand for: “product,” “place,” “price,” and “promotion.” To show you how effective they can be, let’s imagine we want to market a new lamp. The lamp is special because it mimics the warmth and light of the sun.

We’d start by asking key questions about the first P – the product itself. One important thing to ask is, “What do our customers want?” The answer could be that they crave warm, natural light, especially on dark winter days. We could also ask how it differs from competing products. Our lamp is of higher quality, and its light is more like the sun than the others on the market, So let’s look at the next P, which is place.

Where would buyers look for this lamp? Will it be stocked in a store, sold by sales reps, or advertised exclusively online? The next P is price. Will people think that the lamp is good value? Is our target customer price sensitive?

How will the cost of our lamp compare with the others on the market? The last P is promotion. This is where you’ll define when, where and how you’ll get your message out to your customers. So, what’s the best way to market your innovative sun lamp? One question you need to ask is about timing.

For our product, the best time to market it would probably be in the fall or winter, when everyone is craving light and sunshine.

Overall, the four Ps is a useful starting point for building a marketing campaign. The tool helps you define what you want to say to your customers, and how you want to say it. You can find out more about the four Ps, and the questions to ask for each of them, in the article that accompanies this video..

Read More: TEST Marketing Mix 4Ps | McDonald’s Examples

As found on YouTube

TEST Marketing Mix 4Ps | McDonald’s Examples


The Marketing Mix 4Ps is an analytical model used by businesses to attract customers. It is made up of four elements which are referred to as Ps, simply because they all start with the letter P. These are Product, Price, Place, and Promotion. It’s important to be aware that the most effective businesses constantly adapt their marketing mix to the changes which happen within their environment. In this video, we will look at each P individually and apply the Marketing Mix to McDonalds to see how they effectively use the 4Ps to attract customers.

The first P is product. The product element of the marketing mix is focused on the products or services that a business sells. Products are classified as tangible items as they come in a physical form and can be touched by the consumer.

For example, smart phones, clothing, and trainers are all classed as tangible products. Whereas services are classed as intangible as they cannot be touched by the consumer.

Examples of services include, beauty treatments, car valeting, and pet sitting. When developing a product to sell to the public, it’s crucially important that the business conducts market research to identify the wants and needs of the consumers within its target market. Following this, where possible a business should seek to differentiate its products and services to stand out from the competition and increase the chances of the customers shopping with them. This is where the USP comes into play as the business aims to make the product or service different to what is already available elsewhere in the market. Traditionally, McDonald’s offered fast food which was perceived by the public as predominately unhealthy but tasty, with the core products within its portfolio including burgers, chips, and milkshakes.

However, over the years McDonald’s has diversified its product portfolio and adapted to changing consumer tastes.

For example, McDonald’s has introduced a wide range of diverse products such as it’s McCafe range, a breakfast menu, salads, aswell as vegetarian and vegan meal options. This has helped McDonald’s to attract a wider audience and meet the wants and needs of more consumers, which in turn has helped them to increase sales. We now move onto the second P which is Price.

Price is focused on the selling price set by the business for its products and services.

It’s a very important element of the marketing mix and one that truly impacts buyer behaviour. Before setting a selling price, it’s important that the business understands how much the customers within their target market are willing and able to pay. but there are several factors which influence this. These include: The availability of the product or service, for example, if a product is in short supply, this typically drives up the price a business can charge. Competition in the market also impacts price, for example, if a business has many competitors who offer similar products or services, it is likely that it will need to reduce its prices to compete and attract customers within the crowded marketplace.

In addition, the brand image is a very influential factor as most customers have a preconceived opinion about the business and its products which influences its worth to them.

A business with a very strong brand image is typically able to charge more for their products and services as customers find the brand desirable and trustworthy. Once a business has considered these factors and knows how much the customers within their target market are willing and able to pay for its products and services, it’s then able to utilise a range of pricing strategies to influence buyer behaviour. The price of McDonald’s products could be considered as being very competitive with many people visiting McDonald’s stores not only because of factors such as convenience and speed but because the products are also very affordable. They even offer customers a ‘Saver Menu’ which features fan favourites such as the famous cheeseburger, Fries, and McFlurry’s for just 99p.

However, in recent years, McDonald’s have introduced a signature range which is focused on what they deem to be a more premium upmarket product with a higher selling price, with the aim of attracting customers who are willing to pay more for a better-quality product that still comes with the convenience and familiarity of McDonalds. The third P of the marketing mix is Place. Place is focused on the location where customers can purchase the products or services which the business offers. Common examples of place include: Retail stores which customers can physically visit. Online such as a website or a mobile application which customers can access via the internet.

Or purchases made directly from the manufacturer. In today’s business world, it’s very important to provide customers with the opportunity to purchase products and services in a variety of places which are convenient to them such as having both physical retail stores and a website.

As of 2020, McDonald’s had over 39,000 restaurants around the world, meaning customers are never too far away from a McDonald’s or seeing those famous arches in the distance. Traditionally, McDonald’s could only be purchased instore at their restaurants or by utilising their drive through. This has all changed in recent years as McDonald’s have introduced a variety of new ways for customers to purchase their products which include: A mobile application known as ‘My McDonald’s’ which allows customers to order online and a delivery service which is known as ‘McDelivery’ that allows customers to have food delivered directly to them through third party delivery services such as Uber Eats and Just Eat.

The fourth and final P is Promotion. Promotion is focused on the activities undertaken by a business to generate interest and make customers aware of the products and services which they sell. Businesses often use a wide variety of promotional activities with the aim of ultimately increasing sales. Common methods of promotion include discounts and special offers, social media activity, influencers, sponsorship, and advertising across a range of multimedia such as TV, radio, billboards, online video, and website banners. McDonald’s uses a mixture of promotional activities to bring attention to the brand and increase sales.

Advertising is one of their most effective promotional techniques and something McDonald’s takes very seriously, having spent over $600 million in 2020 alone to carry out campaigns across TV, Newspaper, Radio and billboards just to name a few. McDonald’s also use sales promotion as a short-term incentive which is designed to encourage people to buy more of their fast-food products. For example, the Monopoly promotion where customers receive stickers with their meal which gives them the chance of winning free food, discounts at certain retailers or even cash prizes for a limited time which has successfully increased sales at McDonald’s as people buy more often and buy larger meals to increase their chances of winning.

McDonald’s also utilise direct marketing through email and app notifications by targeting their customers with special offers and seasonal menus items designed to encourage them to make an order online or instore. Now that we’ve looked at each of the 4Ps with some examples of how McDonald’s utilises them, it’s important to be aware that the 4Ps shouldn’t be used in isolation and for the marketing mix to be truly effective in attracting customers and increasing spending, it’s crucial that each element of the marketing mix complements the others.

Hopefully, that’s provided you with a better understanding of this analytical marketing model and how it is used in business. If you’ve found the video helpful, it would be appreciated if you could hit the like button and remember to subscribe to Two Teacher’s YouTube channel if you aren’t already to see lots more business videos just like this.

Thanks for listening and all the best..

Read More: TEST Marketing Mix 4P’s | Apple iPhone Example | How do these 4P’s help a business to sell more products?

As found on YouTube

TEST Marketing Mix 4P’s | Apple iPhone Example | How do these 4P’s help a business to sell more products?


Hello and welcome to this video which is focused on the 4Ps of the marketing mix and will  use Apple’s iPhone as a worked example the first people are going to look at is product the product  can be designed satisfy the needs of a certain group of people the product can be both intangible  or tangible as it can be in the form of services or goods the example we’re using for the product  element of the marketing mix is an iPhone and is therefore a tangible product it’s very important  to develop the right type of product that is in demand for the target market therefore during the  product development stage the business would typically conduct extensive research on the  lifecycle of a product that they are developing it is important to know that most products have  a limited lifespan especially in markets which are constantly changing such as one the Apple operates  within as technology is forever advancing however there are some examples of products which have  outlasted the average especially food products such as bread milk and eggs which have been  popular items with shoppers for decades and still are today however all businesses will conduct  extensive market research on their products and will seek to develop line and brand extensions to  prolong the product life cycle this is something that Apple are experts at continually providing  upgrades of their current product range by releasing new iPhones on a regular basis  which ultimately increases the demand for their products it’s also very common for businesses  to create a range of products to ensure they have the right product mix to meet the demands  of their market typically expanding the product range by diversifying and increasing the depth  of the product line something that Apple does very well every time it releases a new product  providing the public with numerous options of the same product for example the iPhone 11 is available  in three different versions which are pictured on the screen right now we’ve got the iPhone 11  the iPhone 11 Pro and the iPhone 11 pro max helping them to meet the demands of more of the market the  second element of the marketing mix is price this is simply the amount the customers willing to pay  for a product or service it is a key element of the marketing mix and for business in general as  any changes to the price could have a significant influence on behavior and ultimately sales and  the demand of the product using the right pricing strategy is key to a successful product launch and  life cycle there are several pricing strategies to choose from and it’s not only dependent on  the product itself what many factors must be considered such as the competitors in the market and  the reputation of the business in general pricing has a huge psychological impact on customers  buying behavior for example by pricing low to increase sales customers may Judge the product as  being inferior to its competitors in contrast a price deemed too high by customers may put them off  completely when setting the product price marketers should consider the perceived value of the product  offers there are four common pricing strategies used in marketing these are skimming penetration  premium and economic please note that these will have other names depending on the program you  are studying and who you talk to therefore we have created a video on the different pricing  strategies so head over to our channel to find out more it can be argued that Apple use premium  pricing and alongside the quality of the product premium pricing can have the psychological effect  of making the customers want the product more as it is seen as a luxury thus increasing  the demand because of this premium price the third key element within the marketing mix is place this  is the location where the potential customers can purchase the item and is another key element  to the products overall success it is essential that businesses locate their products in as many  places that are accessible to the target market as possible thus the more convenient the better  this comes with a deep understanding of the target market understand them inside out and the business  will discover the most efficient positioning and distribution channels that directly speak with their  market for example Apple’s iPhone 11 is available both in stores and online also known as clicks  and bricks both of these are crucial locations as physical stores all our potential customers  get hands-on with the iPhone while online stores provide the convenience for people to purchase  the new iPhone on their current mobile device promotion is the final element of the 4 Ps  and is used to inform customers that a product is either coming out soon or is available to buy  right now once the first three elements of the marketing mix are in place it is crucial to  promote the product for example Apple create mystery and buzz before the product launches  they tend to have withhold information around new products and leak them slowly over the weeks  and months before the product releases this gets the market excited and talking about the product  and its potential features following this apple will also have a product launch which is highly  anticipated and watched by many of their loyal customers once the product launches it is then  supported by a series of simplistic advertisements such as the one you can see on your screen right  now ultimately if a business manages to combine all four of the basic elements of the marketing  mix they have a great chance of success and increased sales of their products thank you  for listening if you’ve got any questions about the content that we’ve discussed today  please leave a question below on the comments section and we’ll be sure to get back to you

Read More: TESTING The Marketing Mix Explained: The 4 Ps of Marketing

As found on YouTube

TESTING The Marketing Mix Explained: The 4 Ps of Marketing


Hey there, fellow marketers. Professor Wolters here, and today we’re in Vicenza, Italy. And today we’re gonna talk about is probably one of the most key elements of marketing. And that is the marketing mix, the four P’s of marketing: product, price, place, promotion. And each one of these things are key to any marketer, understanding their market, what they’re going to do, how they’re going to succeed.

And so let’s go through these four kind of basic topics to get started. Now, you first off you have your product, right? Now, your product captures value. It’s something that people really want. And the thing is a product isn’t just a thing.

It’s not just, you know, a phone or something like that. It could be a service. It could be an idea. Any of these things that people feel is valuable, that’s creating it. That’s something, people that is something they want.

Whether it’s, I want a hot dog or I want some bigoli pasta here in Vicenza. There’s something that people want to have and there’s things we can do to kind of increase the value that we create with our products. I mean, think about it. If you have kind of a basic car, you know, a two door car, that’s really tiny that doesn’t have a lot of power, you don’t expect to spend a lot of money on that, do you? No.

But if you have a car with nice seats in it and a good stereo and all kinds of stuff like that, like yeah, I like this a bit better. That’s creating more value from it. I really want this more. And so you can do those things. Think about services.

If you’re a better company at delivering a good service, aren’t you willing to pay more money for a restaurant that gives you good service, than a restaurant that gives you bad service? So we can create value that way. So that’s your product, okay. Now the next thing we look at are the prices and price is actually how we actually capture value.

What does it actually represent?

How much should people value these things that we’re doing? And the thing is how many of you have been inspired to buy something because of the price? Oh, buy one, get one free. Sure, I’ll get that. Or it’s 50% off, sure, I’ll buy that.

Price is really an important thing. And as a marketer, you can use that to market your products. Hey, we’re the dollar store, hello? You have these kinds of things. You have that.

And so when you’re looking at price, you gotta realize is price is different things. Like there’s actually a price that people pay, right? There’s the manufacturer suggested retail price, we might look at that.

But really price depends on how people value that product, okay. Because I may feel something’s worth $10 and you might think it’s worth $5.

We have different values for those things. So we gotta find the right price that captures that value for people. Because if you think about it, if I say, hey, I’ll give you a two-week trip to Italy for $2,000. You’re like, wow, that sounds like a great deal. Well, yeah, if you’re flying from Illinois to Italy tomorrow, yeah, 2000 bucks, that’s just going to be your plane ticket, let alone a hotel and eating and stuff like that.

But the thing is, if you’re living in Padova or Venice, which is like, you know, 40 minutes away, you’re like, why would I spend two grand to go to Vicenza when I could stay at my own house? There’s no value there for me. So you really have to think about it in a perspective kind of thing, all right.

So think about that. Also, when you think about prices, you want to think about how people think about prices.

Historically speaking, I mean, ask a college students what their parents said when they told their parents what the tuition bill was like, oh my God! When I went to school, it was only a couple of hundred dollars, or a couple thousand dollars, and now it’s like a couple hundred thousand dollars. Well, yeah, over time, historical prices do change. So that’s something you got to think about. And another thing you gotta look at is capturing that value with price is sometimes you look at it in terms of, you know, quantity, quality, these kinds of things like yeah.

If you’re gonna be flying here to Italy from the US, yeah, you can fly economy, no problem. You can find nonstop Chicago to Venice, easiest pie, but you’re gonna pay more than if you fly to Paris first and then fly to Venice, okay. So we realized that, hhm, people value that direct flight more than taking a connector flight, so we can charge more for that. Okay. So you see those things out there.

Also, people are willing to pay more money for business class or first class. Cause they get, you know, maybe better service or better food or more leg room, so I have plenty of space.

So I get here and I feel relaxed. So we look at those things, okay. When you’re looking at capturing those values, okay.

Now the third P we’re looking at is place, that is delivering the value. How are we gonna deliver that value? Well, you think about it, think about the retail places you’re going to sell your product in. Won’t that influence how it’s perceived? If I’m selling it at a cheap store, it’s gonna be perceived as cheap.

If I sell it at a high end store, it’s gonna be seen as a higher end, more quality product. And so we have those. Think about your website. Do you buy stuff from a website that looks kind of shady? Heck no, you don’t do that.

And you’re like, it’s gotta look legit for me to give them my credit card. That’s also part of delivering the value. But also how do we deliver the value of a good night’s sleep at a hotel, right? We have to think about that. What goes all into that?

Oh, having good beds, nice pillows, quiet walls, maybe not near a street, or thick windows to block the sound.

We have to think about all those things that we need to do in order to deliver the value to people, to that place, okay. And then the fourth P is promotion. We need to promote our goods, right? We need to promote our products and promotion is communicating that value.

We need to let people know. I mean, think about it.

Has there ever been a concert you heard about after the concert happens. Or a friend of yours was in town that you found out after they posted their pictures on Instagram. Like, wait, you were in town?

I didn’t even know. Well, the same problem happens for companies. We’ve got to communicate that value. Let people know when the concert is, let them know what kind of food we have at that restaurant. Because if people don’t know what Bob’s restaurant has they probably won’t go there because they don’t know what Bob’s is serving.

And the thing is that fourth P, that promotion, is probably the most common thing people think about when they think of the four P’s of marketing, when they think of marketing in general. They think of more the advertising side of things, right. We’re communicating to the customer. We’re promoting to the customer. But the thing is, market is much more than just advertising.

Marketing is creating those new products, right? We’re trying to figure out what to make. So the first P. We’re also trying to figure out how we price things for pricing kind of stuff, capturing what it’s really worth for people. We have that.

Deciding where we’re gonna sell and how we’re going to sell things. That’s that place thing, delivering the value. All these things go together to make our marketing mix. And what you need to realize is all these are important for when you’re trying to sell your products or promote your products. Whether it’s ads or stuff like that.

So I hope this gives you like a nice, basic idea of what the marketing mix is, what those four P’s are. If it does give you a good idea, hey, give me a thumbs up, so I know we’re doing a good job. If it doesn’t just leave a comment down below or something like that, so we have an idea there.

But I hope this does help to give you an idea of the four P’s of marketing. If you wanna learn more about marketing hit that subscribe button.

We’ve got all kinds of marketing videos, business videos, YouTube help videos on this channel. ‘Cause we’re trying to help marketers out there, business students out there, we’re trying to help new entrepreneurs and YouTubers and all kinds of people do a better job of marketing themselves and being part of the business world. And maybe helping to get a better grade on the exam if you’re a student. So I do appreciate your likes and your subscriptions and have a great time.

And I’ll say bye from here in Vicenza.

.

Read More: The Marketing Mix Explained: The 4 Ps of Marketing

As found on YouTube

The Marketing Mix Explained: The 4 Ps of Marketing


Hey there, fellow marketers. Professor Wolters here, and today we’re in Vicenza, Italy. And today we’re gonna talk about is probably one of the most key elements of marketing. And that is the marketing mix, the four P’s of marketing: product, price, place, promotion. And each one of these things are key to any marketer, understanding their market, what they’re going to do, how they’re going to succeed.

And so let’s go through these four kind of basic topics to get started.

Now, you first off you have your product, right? Now, your product captures value. It’s something that people really want. And the thing is a product isn’t just a thing.

It’s not just, you know, a phone or something like that. It could be a service. It could be an idea. Any of these things that people feel is valuable, that’s creating it. That’s something, people that is something they want.

Whether it’s, I want a hot dog or I want some bigoli pasta here in Vicenza. There’s something that people want to have and there’s things we can do to kind of increase the value that we create with our products. I mean, think about it. If you have kind of a basic car, you know, a two door car, that’s really tiny that doesn’t have a lot of power, you don’t expect to spend a lot of money on that, do you? No.

But if you have a car with nice seats in it and a good stereo and all kinds of stuff like that, like yeah, I like this a bit better. That’s creating more value from it. I really want this more. And so you can do those things. Think about services.

If you’re a better company at delivering a good service, aren’t you willing to pay more money for a restaurant that gives you good service, than a restaurant that gives you bad service? So we can create value that way. So that’s your product, okay. Now the next thing we look at are the prices and price is actually how we actually capture value. What does it actually represent?

How much should people value these things that we’re doing? And the thing is how many of you have been inspired to buy something because of the price? Oh, buy one, get one free. Sure, I’ll get that. Or it’s 50% off, sure, I’ll buy that.

Price is really an important thing. And as a marketer, you can use that to market your products. Hey, we’re the dollar store, hello? You have these kinds of things. You have that.

And so when you’re looking at price, you gotta realize is price is different things. Like there’s actually a price that people pay, right? There’s the manufacturer suggested retail price, we might look at that. But really price depends on how people value that product, okay. Because I may feel something’s worth $10 and you might think it’s worth $5.

We have different values for those things. So we gotta find the right price that captures that value for people. Because if you think about it, if I say, hey, I’ll give you a two-week trip to Italy for $2,000. You’re like, wow, that sounds like a great deal. Well, yeah, if you’re flying from Illinois to Italy tomorrow, yeah, 2000 bucks, that’s just going to be your plane ticket, let alone a hotel and eating and stuff like that.

But the thing is, if you’re living in Padova or Venice, which is like, you know, 40 minutes away, you’re like, why would I spend two grand to go to Vicenza when I could stay at my own house? There’s no value there for me. So you really have to think about it in a perspective kind of thing, all right. So think about that. Also, when you think about prices, you want to think about how people think about prices.

Historically speaking, I mean, ask a college students what their parents said when they told their parents what the tuition bill was like, oh my God! When I went to school, it was only a couple of hundred dollars, or a couple thousand dollars, and now it’s like a couple hundred thousand dollars. Well, yeah, over time, historical prices do change.

So that’s something you got to think about. And another thing you gotta look at is capturing that value with price is sometimes you look at it in terms of, you know, quantity, quality, these kinds of things like yeah.

If you’re gonna be flying here to Italy from the US, yeah, you can fly economy, no problem. You can find nonstop Chicago to Venice, easiest pie, but you’re gonna pay more than if you fly to Paris first and then fly to Venice, okay.

So we realized that, hhm, people value that direct flight more than taking a connector flight, so we can charge more for that. Okay. So you see those things out there.

Also, people are willing to pay more money for business class or first class. Cause they get, you know, maybe better service or better food or more leg room, so I have plenty of space. So I get here and I feel relaxed. So we look at those things, okay. When you’re looking at capturing those values, okay.

Now the third P we’re looking at is place, that is delivering the value. How are we gonna deliver that value? Well, you think about it, think about the retail places you’re going to sell your product in. Won’t that influence how it’s perceived? If I’m selling it at a cheap store, it’s gonna be perceived as cheap.

If I sell it at a high end store, it’s gonna be seen as a higher end, more quality product. And so we have those. Think about your website. Do you buy stuff from a website that looks kind of shady? Heck no, you don’t do that.

And you’re like, it’s gotta look legit for me to give them my credit card. That’s also part of delivering the value. But also how do we deliver the value of a good night’s sleep at a hotel, right? We have to think about that. What goes all into that?

Oh, having good beds, nice pillows, quiet walls, maybe not near a street, or thick windows to block the sound. We have to think about all those things that we need to do in order to deliver the value to people, to that place, okay. And then the fourth P is promotion. We need to promote our goods, right? We need to promote our products and promotion is communicating that value.

We need to let people know. I mean, think about it. Has there ever been a concert you heard about after the concert happens. Or a friend of yours was in town that you found out after they posted their pictures on Instagram. Like, wait, you were in town?

I didn’t even know. Well, the same problem happens for companies. We’ve got to communicate that value. Let people know when the concert is, let them know what kind of food we have at that restaurant.

Because if people don’t know what Bob’s restaurant has they probably won’t go there because they don’t know what Bob’s is serving.

And the thing is that fourth P, that promotion, is probably the most common thing people think about when they think of the four P’s of marketing, when they think of marketing in general. They think of more the advertising side of things, right. We’re communicating to the customer. We’re promoting to the customer. But the thing is, market is much more than just advertising.

Marketing is creating those new products, right? We’re trying to figure out what to make. So the first P. We’re also trying to figure out how we price things for pricing kind of stuff, capturing what it’s really worth for people. We have that.

Deciding where we’re gonna sell and how we’re going to sell things.

That’s that place thing, delivering the value. All these things go together to make our marketing mix. And what you need to realize is all these are important for when you’re trying to sell your products or promote your products. Whether it’s ads or stuff like that.

So I hope this gives you like a nice, basic idea of what the marketing mix is, what those four P’s are. If it does give you a good idea, hey, give me a thumbs up, so I know we’re doing a good job.

If it doesn’t just leave a comment down below or something like that, so we have an idea there. But I hope this does help to give you an idea of the four P’s of marketing. If you wanna learn more about marketing hit that subscribe button.

We’ve got all kinds of marketing videos, business videos, YouTube help videos on this channel. ‘Cause we’re trying to help marketers out there, business students out there, we’re trying to help new entrepreneurs and YouTubers and all kinds of people do a better job of marketing themselves and being part of the business world. And maybe helping to get a better grade on the exam if you’re a student. So I do appreciate your likes and your subscriptions and have a great time. And I’ll say bye from here in Vicenza.

Read More: Session 2, Part 1: Marketing and Sales

As found on YouTube

The Marketing Mix Explained: The 4 Ps of Marketing


Hey there, fellow marketers. Professor Wolters here, and today we’re in Vicenza, Italy. And today we’re gonna talk about is probably one of the most key elements of marketing. And that is the marketing mix, the four P’s of marketing: product, price, place, promotion. And each one of these things are key to any marketer, understanding their market, what they’re going to do, how they’re going to succeed.

And so let’s go through these four kind of basic topics to get started.

Now, you first off you have your product, right? Now, your product captures value. It’s something that people really want. And the thing is a product isn’t just a thing.

It’s not just, you know, a phone or something like that. It could be a service. It could be an idea. Any of these things that people feel is valuable, that’s creating it. That’s something, people that is something they want.

Whether it’s, I want a hot dog or I want some bigoli pasta here in Vicenza. There’s something that people want to have and there’s things we can do to kind of increase the value that we create with our products. I mean, think about it. If you have kind of a basic car, you know, a two door car, that’s really tiny that doesn’t have a lot of power, you don’t expect to spend a lot of money on that, do you? No.

But if you have a car with nice seats in it and a good stereo and all kinds of stuff like that, like yeah, I like this a bit better. That’s creating more value from it. I really want this more. And so you can do those things. Think about services.

If you’re a better company at delivering a good service, aren’t you willing to pay more money for a restaurant that gives you good service, than a restaurant that gives you bad service? So we can create value that way. So that’s your product, okay. Now the next thing we look at are the prices and price is actually how we actually capture value. What does it actually represent?

How much should people value these things that we’re doing? And the thing is how many of you have been inspired to buy something because of the price? Oh, buy one, get one free. Sure, I’ll get that. Or it’s 50% off, sure, I’ll buy that.

Price is really an important thing. And as a marketer, you can use that to market your products. Hey, we’re the dollar store, hello? You have these kinds of things. You have that.

And so when you’re looking at price, you gotta realize is price is different things. Like there’s actually a price that people pay, right? There’s the manufacturer suggested retail price, we might look at that. But really price depends on how people value that product, okay. Because I may feel something’s worth $10 and you might think it’s worth $5.

We have different values for those things. So we gotta find the right price that captures that value for people. Because if you think about it, if I say, hey, I’ll give you a two-week trip to Italy for $2,000. You’re like, wow, that sounds like a great deal. Well, yeah, if you’re flying from Illinois to Italy tomorrow, yeah, 2000 bucks, that’s just going to be your plane ticket, let alone a hotel and eating and stuff like that.

But the thing is, if you’re living in Padova or Venice, which is like, you know, 40 minutes away, you’re like, why would I spend two grand to go to Vicenza when I could stay at my own house? There’s no value there for me. So you really have to think about it in a perspective kind of thing, all right. So think about that. Also, when you think about prices, you want to think about how people think about prices.

Historically speaking, I mean, ask a college students what their parents said when they told their parents what the tuition bill was like, oh my God! When I went to school, it was only a couple of hundred dollars, or a couple thousand dollars, and now it’s like a couple hundred thousand dollars. Well, yeah, over time, historical prices do change.

So that’s something you got to think about. And another thing you gotta look at is capturing that value with price is sometimes you look at it in terms of, you know, quantity, quality, these kinds of things like yeah.

If you’re gonna be flying here to Italy from the US, yeah, you can fly economy, no problem. You can find nonstop Chicago to Venice, easiest pie, but you’re gonna pay more than if you fly to Paris first and then fly to Venice, okay.

So we realized that, hhm, people value that direct flight more than taking a connector flight, so we can charge more for that. Okay. So you see those things out there.

Also, people are willing to pay more money for business class or first class. Cause they get, you know, maybe better service or better food or more leg room, so I have plenty of space. So I get here and I feel relaxed. So we look at those things, okay. When you’re looking at capturing those values, okay.

Now the third P we’re looking at is place, that is delivering the value. How are we gonna deliver that value? Well, you think about it, think about the retail places you’re going to sell your product in. Won’t that influence how it’s perceived? If I’m selling it at a cheap store, it’s gonna be perceived as cheap.

If I sell it at a high end store, it’s gonna be seen as a higher end, more quality product. And so we have those. Think about your website. Do you buy stuff from a website that looks kind of shady? Heck no, you don’t do that.

And you’re like, it’s gotta look legit for me to give them my credit card. That’s also part of delivering the value. But also how do we deliver the value of a good night’s sleep at a hotel, right? We have to think about that. What goes all into that?

Oh, having good beds, nice pillows, quiet walls, maybe not near a street, or thick windows to block the sound. We have to think about all those things that we need to do in order to deliver the value to people, to that place, okay. And then the fourth P is promotion. We need to promote our goods, right? We need to promote our products and promotion is communicating that value.

We need to let people know. I mean, think about it. Has there ever been a concert you heard about after the concert happens. Or a friend of yours was in town that you found out after they posted their pictures on Instagram. Like, wait, you were in town?

I didn’t even know. Well, the same problem happens for companies. We’ve got to communicate that value. Let people know when the concert is, let them know what kind of food we have at that restaurant.

Because if people don’t know what Bob’s restaurant has they probably won’t go there because they don’t know what Bob’s is serving.

And the thing is that fourth P, that promotion, is probably the most common thing people think about when they think of the four P’s of marketing, when they think of marketing in general. They think of more the advertising side of things, right. We’re communicating to the customer. We’re promoting to the customer. But the thing is, market is much more than just advertising.

Marketing is creating those new products, right? We’re trying to figure out what to make. So the first P. We’re also trying to figure out how we price things for pricing kind of stuff, capturing what it’s really worth for people. We have that.

Deciding where we’re gonna sell and how we’re going to sell things.

That’s that place thing, delivering the value. All these things go together to make our marketing mix. And what you need to realize is all these are important for when you’re trying to sell your products or promote your products. Whether it’s ads or stuff like that.

So I hope this gives you like a nice, basic idea of what the marketing mix is, what those four P’s are. If it does give you a good idea, hey, give me a thumbs up, so I know we’re doing a good job.

If it doesn’t just leave a comment down below or something like that, so we have an idea there. But I hope this does help to give you an idea of the four P’s of marketing. If you wanna learn more about marketing hit that subscribe button.

We’ve got all kinds of marketing videos, business videos, YouTube help videos on this channel. ‘Cause we’re trying to help marketers out there, business students out there, we’re trying to help new entrepreneurs and YouTubers and all kinds of people do a better job of marketing themselves and being part of the business world. And maybe helping to get a better grade on the exam if you’re a student. So I do appreciate your likes and your subscriptions and have a great time. And I’ll say bye from here in Vicenza.

Read More: Session 2, Part 1: Marketing and Sales

As found on YouTube